MTWS Explorer / Lesson Prototype - Guitar Note Intervals

This exploration tool is for learning about intervals between notes on the guitar fretboard for any guitar tuning.

Note: This Explorer / Lesson interface can be used by a student for self-study, or by a teacher in a classroom to generate visuals.  You can locate notes in standard guitar tuning (EADGBE) and other tunings on the guitar fretboard diagram below.  Have you ever experimented with alternate tunings, like Open G or Drop D tunings, and wondered, "now, where did the notes go?".  Well, now you can find them.  You can also hover/hold your mouse over any given fret/string and see the note name appear.  You have various options to choose from, so feel free to experiment.



Interval:
Half-Steps:

P1
0

m2
1

M2
2

m3
3

M3
4

P4
5

A4=d5
6

P5
7

A5=m6
8

M6
9

m7
10

M7
11

P8
12

Chromatic Note:     Interval Direction:  Up   Down    Interval Color:     

Guitar Strings+Frets      Pick/Strum:    Speed 

1st: E
2nd: B
3rd: G
4th: D
5th: A
6th: E
   
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
o o o o oo o

   Auto Clear:  yes no      Instrument:

Tuning:


Notes:


Include Open Notes
Allow String Selection
Position:  

Width:  

Color:  
Hand Preference:
Left-handed
Right-handed

Guitar Perspective:
Guitar on your lap
Facing another guitarist

Description

This exploration tool is for learning about intervals between notes on the guitar fretboard for any guitar tuning.  Choose the starting note (chromatic), interval and direction.  Then click View Notes button to see where both the selected and related interval notes appear on the fretboard.  You can choose dot colors for the selected and interval note.

Note: This Explorer / Lesson interface can be used by a student for self-study, or by a teacher in a classroom to generate visuals.  You can locate notes in standard guitar tuning (EADGBE) and other tunings on the guitar fretboard diagram below.  Have you ever experimented with alternate tunings, like Open G or Drop D tunings, and wondered, "now, where did the notes go?".  Well, now you can find them.  You can also hover/hold your mouse over any given fret/string and see the note name appear.  You have various options to choose from, so feel free to experiment.

See Instructions tab for more details.

If desired, image(s) for related Standard Notation and/or Guitar Tablature can be included here along with descriptive text.  Also, a related YouTube video could be embedded here.

Note Names and Frequencies:

Pick/Strum:    

MIDI Notes:  



Instructions

Virtual Fretboard

The "answers" to Music Theory questions are rendered as dots on the Virtual Fretboard. The dots represent locations on the fretboard for a given note (i.e. where to put your finger on fretboard). This is an interactive tool, so go ahead and experiment, and ask Music Theory questions (use the web forms). You might learn a few things about notes, intervals, scales or chords and get a better understanding of the guitar fretboard.

Under the fretboard there is a button titled "Clear Fretboard" which allows you to clear previously painted dots. There is also an Auto Clear Notes option (yes/no). When Auto Clear Notes is "yes" (default setting), it means that each time you click web form button (i.e. "View Notes") it will clear out the previously painted dots from the virtual fretboard. If you set Auto Clear Notes to "no", it allows you to retain the existing dots (note locations) and add more dots with the next question / answer from the web service. You can use Auto Clear Notes set to "no" along with Color selection. That means you can add dots of different colors on the fretboard. For example, you might want to have a "root note" (of scale or chord) in one color, and the other note dots in a different color.

Note: The layout of the Display Options and Virtual Fretboard, lesson text, etc. may change eventually, as I would like to make the online lesson webpages "responsive" to different screen widths (PC monitor, laptop screen, smart phones or tablet computers). But the types of Display Options and what they mean and how they work will still remain the same.

Display Options

You can use the Display Options to explore the fretboard view, and change how results are displayed:

The Tuning select list allows you to choose standard tuning (default) and alternative / open tunings.

You can also use the Notes select list to specify note occurrences on the fretboard, such as lowest position occurrence, highest position occurrence, ALL occurrences, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th occurrences of the virtual fretboard.

You can also choose to Include Open Notes (default is yes), or allow specific Allow String Selection (default is all 6 strings).

You can specify fret / hand Position (where your first finger or index finger is positioned on the fretboard). You can also specify the Width, or how many frets to utilize for note display, starting from the selected Position.

You can change the Color of the dots appearing on the fretboard (i.e. cyan, green, blue, etc). The Color selection also includes an option called "ebony+ivory" (like piano keys), which will display white dots for natural notes and black dots for sharp and flat notes.

The Hand Preference option allows you to specify right or left hand. The Guitar Perspective option lets you view the virtual fretboard as if your guitar was in your lap, or if you were facing another guitar player.

Audio Help

Note: For MIDI audio capability, this page requires a Jazz-Soft.net Jazz-Plugin.  Here is the download link.

2013 Audio / MIDI status

MIDI capability was included in this Virtual Guitar Fretboard in 2013, using the MIDI plugin from Jazz-Soft.net.  At that time, using the Jazz-Soft JavaScript's API, I was able to provide MIDI playback of notes rendered on the Virtual Guitar Fretboard.  This worked for Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Internet Explorer and Google Chrome browsers.  The only caveat was that the user had to download the install the Jazz-Soft.net plugin.

2018 Audio / MIDI status

Fast forward to 2018, along with HTML5 feature upgrades, the browser developers have moved on to support NPAPI (Netscape Plugin API) for Audio / MIDI.  Jazz-Soft.net is advising the use of the their JZZ.js (JavaScript library) to handle the new method of producing "on the fly" MIDI notes.

As such, the prior JavaScript code that I wrote to utilize the earlier Jazz-Soft.net API no longer works for Firefox and Chrome browsers.  But it still does work for me with my Microsoft Internet Explorer version.  So if you want to actually hear the notes at this time, via the Pick / Strum buttons on Lesson or Note Info tabs, you will have to "try" using Microsoft IE browser.

I have done some initial simple tests with the Jazz-Soft.net JZZ.js code, in Firefox, Chrome and Microsoft IE.  Those tests worked fine for all three browsers.  So on my "To Do" list is reworking the code for the Pick / Strum buttons to switch to using the Jazz-Soft.net JZZ.js code instead.  That will help to restore the audio capability that previously worked for Firefox and Chrome browsers.

As for Android and iOS mobile devices (tablets and phones), that will require more research and testing.  I'm hoping the above mentioned switch to using the JZZ.js code will help towards MIDI audio for mobile devices.

Stay tuned!

Lesson Index

Notes

  • Lesson 1
  • Lesson 2
  • Lesson 3

Intervals

  • Lesson 1
  • Lesson 2
  • Lesson 3

Scales and Modes

  • Lesson 1
  • Lesson 2
  • Lesson 3

Chords

  • Lesson 1
  • Lesson 2
  • Lesson 3

Chord Progressions

  • Lesson 1
  • Lesson 2
  • Lesson 3

Web Links

Acoustic Guitar Magazine: As an acoustic guitar player, I enjoy reading Acoustic Guitar Magazine.  Their lessons in print and online also include standard music notation, in addition to guitar tablature.  As someone who learned initially from the Mel Bay book with music notation I appreciate this.  For me, my primary music language is standard musical notation.  Tablature (play by number) is a second language to me.  I understand the pros and cons of using Tablature.  Guitar Tab does have it's benefits for getting beginner guitar students interested, and provides for some "early victories".  But since I like to arrange music from various genres and sources, being able to read standard music notation (from a piano book of popular music, or hymnal) is beneficial.